action/2015

This week world leaders gathering in New York will make decisions that affect the future of billions. These are decisions that could end some of the most prominent issues of our time. Like ending extreme poverty. Fighting inequality and injustice. Fixing climate change. In all countries. For all people. We have a huge opportunity and we must take it.
I'm in New York this week to engage in the Post 2015 development process first hand. I know I'm not alone when I say that the process to agree a new agenda for the fight on global poverty is confusing and impenetrable. This week's focus is on financing and implementation. It's the "who's-going-to-pay?" and "how's-it-going-to-happen?" parts of the puzzle.
It would cost about $10 billion to meet the humanitarian needs in Syria; yet only half of the funding is obtained so far. In contrast, of the $20 billion needed to organise the football World Cup and the Olympics, the costs were fully met.
At every point in history women have always struggled for recognition, rights and equality. This year is no different. The journey for women in the UK, and globally, is far from over. Our incomes and ownership of resources still lag behind men's. Our representation when important decisions are being made - whether in parliaments, boardrooms, or negotiating tables - is paltry. The demands on our time, particularly from unpaid work and care, are overwhelming. And one in three of us will experience violent assault in our lifetime. But I firmly believe the tables are turning.