addiction & recovery

I am sometimes asked what would happen if I did choose to drink again. The truth is, I don't know, but just as I don't know what would happen if someone was to open the door on an airplane mid-flight, I'm pretty sure that I also don't want to find out.
From the teenage boy who tells his mother not to be so hard on herself for relapsing - he tells her it's perfectly normal and that she should keep going - to the daughter who says to her mother she could do this, and get clean and that she wasn't alone, the wisdom, kindness and compassion the documentary allows us to witness, is a window into some of the greatest moments the human condition has to offer.
Alcohol and drug addiction affects more than just user. It also affects family and friends, who are usually the ones to pick up the pieces time and time again, and who (in the worst case scenario) are left dealing with the grief of losing a loved one due to their addiction.
You know that feeling where someone you love has been lying to you? That feeling of having the rug pulled from under you? Imagine that feeling generated by the person you love most in the world. Then imagine it happening again. And again, and again.
I personally interact with hundreds of women on a regular basis who have lived, and are living, through the shattering discovery that their partners and husbands have a secret sexual life. I am committed to giving them a voice so I asked them what they would tell you if they had the chance. Below is a summary of the major points they wanted you to know.
Jason had lived this life for several years, hoping after every relapse that this might be his addict partner's final awakening, her rock bottom but he had been a victim again and again -suffering a monotonous chain of trauma, lies and disappointment. And here he was, he hadn't budged an inch, scavenging through a few happy moments to get him through the day.
UKESAD is a vast get-together of those who work in addiction treatment: therapists, counsellors, managers of rehab clinics, medics and camp-followers like me. They do an important job - saving people from addiction and maybe even an early death - but are unknown to the media and the public.
A Way Out wants to be part of the support that ensures our women can make this choice. Rather than succumbing to negativity, concurring with stereotypical assumptions surrounding those in sex work, and agreeing with the generally accepted inevitability that change is impossible, we believe in possibility and potential...
Our instinct is to run away from pain, because it seems the sober emotional equivalent of drinking it away. But all that happens is we store that pain up inside of us, to the point where we build such an intolerance to the pain that it displays itself in other ways.
The voice of an eating disorder constantly reinforces a belief that you will never truly be content until you reach a certain weight or look a certain way but the truth is that happiness only comes from a self-love that grows from a certain acceptance of who you really are.