Addiction & Recovery

It is a warm September evening and I'm sat in our clinic lounge looking out at a sea of expectant faces. Some familiar, some new, many fearful, others hopeful and excited. We are at a graduation - An event that we hold in honour of each client as she reaches the end of her treatment.
You know that feeling where someone you love has been lying to you? That feeling of having the rug pulled from under you? Imagine that feeling generated by the person you love most in the world. Then imagine it happening again. And again, and again.
I personally interact with hundreds of women on a regular basis who have lived, and are living, through the shattering discovery that their partners and husbands have a secret sexual life. I am committed to giving them a voice so I asked them what they would tell you if they had the chance. Below is a summary of the major points they wanted you to know.
It wasn't until I recently gave evidence at the trial of a paedophile, my schoolteacher, that I realised the devastating
If my life has taught me anything then it is this: Doesn't matter what we are recovering from, all recovery is just a bridge. The start of the bridge is a destination we find ourselves that we don't want to be in. The end of it is the place where we will feel normal again.
There are few thing that make me want to swallow my own face with boredom more than the ridiculous, totally unnecessary, inane whining that goes on in recovery circles between those who describe themselves as a 'recovering' alcoholic, and those who call themselves 'recovered'.
Alcoholism is not something any of us would choose to deliberately, consciously pursue as a lifestyle. But whether we persuade ourselves into it, or are hooked from day one, the fact remains that it is still behaviour. Not affliction.
Russell Brand has been calling for empathy for addicts, and he is right. Whether you adore or despise Brand's Marmite-like character doesn't really matter; you should still listen to him. He understands addiction. He understands addicts.
Life is full of temptations and we need lots of self-control to live a happy life - not having too many helpings of dessert
Many people sneer at the idea that addiction is a disease. "Surely so-and-so can just stop drinking" they say about alcoholics, unaware that an alcoholic can't control his craving for more drink -- just as a cancer or diabetes patient can't control the progression of his disease. Anyone who knows an alcoholic, or a hard core drug addict, will know that many of them desperately want to give up but are unable to.