adolescents

Yesterday, I - like thousands of other women around the world - shared my experience of sexual abuse on social media, under the #MeToo hashtag. This was in response to a tweet by actress Alyssa Milano, urging people to post the words 'me too' if they had ever been sexually harassed or assaulted.
Thanks to some amazing royal and celebrity role models the mental health of children and young people is now a hotly debated
So why has this obsession with 'gyming' grown? In my opinion, contrary to the common belief that it stems from trying to emulate the physique of aspirational celebrities, it more often begins with the simple need to fit in with one's peers.
As a youth worker, should I be celebrating the hilarity of these questions or should I be worried that these are genuine comments that have happened? Some comments may be embellished and others asked simply for the humour - but some are real.
It is time to recognise that 18-25 year olds aren't "adults" when it comes to mental health. Young people face a difficult transition from childhood to adult life, are squeezed by our economic system and face a wide range of pressures affecting their mental health. If special consideration applies to the mental health needs of older adults, surely it is the case that young people aged 18 to 25 deserve some recognition too.
Fewer than half of soldiers say they'd recommend Army life to a friend. While the Army says it offers a bond that 'lasts a lifetime', many veterans struggle to rebuild the social support networks they need, which leaves them more vulnerable to delayed-onset mental health problems.
What does the future look like for the 1.2billion adolescents in the world today, almost 90% of whom live in developing countries? For adolescent girls in particular, under-age marriage, violence and abuse and teenage pregnancy blight their lives. Their access to education or a minimum wage if employed, and especially to health care, is severely limited.
So here I am, joining the ranks and sharing my experience, now that I am able to, to hopefully make one more small step in the right direction. But that's just it: a small step. We need to end the stigma, but for people in recovery, stigma might just be the tip of the iceberg.
We simply don't know enough about the big questions in young people's mental health. Like, what can parent or schools do to help young people in crisis? What are the most effective ways to help? What are the factors causing mental health conditions in young people? And importantly, can we prevent these issues from happening?
At The Children's Society we know from our frontline services that, too often, older teenagers are dismissed as 'old enough to know better' and, as a result often are not identified as victims of child sexual exploitation.