advertising week europe

During Advertising Week and beyond, we need to reflect on the industry as a whole. We have an obligation to accurately represent women and drive equality through our storytelling. Feminism is not niche and it's not a fad. Equality of the sexes benefits us all - male and female - and it's good news for advertisers and publishers alike.
Good magicians depend on a few essential pieces of kit to successfully execute their craft: a wand, a rabbit, a top hat and an audience to wow. Similarly, when it comes to video, marketers need a screen, creative, eyeballs and accurate measurement to track performance.
On International Women's Day, Garnier UK released an advert on Instagram of six women with the caption "We are strong, We are ambitious, We are awesome (and into double denim), We are women". All six women in the advert are white.
I'm about to board the morning flight from Heathrow to New York and I am reminded of a conversation some months ago with a (female) colleague. She told me of her discomfort - I think she actually said horror - as she was boarding a flight and noticed the pilot was a woman.
I've always loved media. It says all the wrong things about me, but big media breakthroughs, driven by technology have been some of the most vivid and exciting moments I can remember.
Last week, Advertising Week Europe (AWE) took place in London for the fourth year, bringing together the biggest and brightest of creative minds from across the EU. AWE's blend of experts from the world of advertising, media, technology and entertainment helped to unpack how creativity is set to change as we accelerate towards our mobile future. An era where people are accessing videos, images and news digitally, from any location, at any time.
While British Airways scores well on loyalty, 75% of people define EasyJet as a "friend with benefits" according to the Human Brands research study. The same research also revealed consumers are having "secret relationships" with brands like McDonald's (60%) too, suggesting they are increasingly indiscriminate, placing ease and availability above brand loyalty.
Millions are afraid of being laughed at, of getting changed in the gym, of being seen to be sweating, of wearing lycra and not possessing a body that looks like a size 8 model. And this fear is preventing them from doing something men are encouraged to do from birth, from harnessing something that will make them feel good, empowered, strong and capable.
Innovation is the lifeblood of any brand and failure to innovate only leads to failing as a business. Google could quite easily take their foot off the gas and simply boss the internet for a decade or two before bowing out to a new upstart, but they will never rest on their laurels - and that's the key. Never sit still. You're never too big to fail.
Advertising Week should be rebranded paranoia week. That's not my idea, but Martin Sorrell's, the CEO of WPP, whom I interviewed on Wednesday at Advertising Week Europe.