ageing population

We are living through one of the biggest changes in human history, not just in Britain, globally too: we are living longer.
These are tough economic times for statutory funding of healthcare. It would be unrealistic to expect NHS funding for hospice care, which has on average made up a third of funding (32 per cent) for adult hospices and 17 per cent for children's services, to be exempt from this.
Population increase in Denmark has been described as "dangerously low" but that might be about to change - a travel company
But what about the hundreds of millions of older people in countries without this social security architecture, and where little or no such services exist? By 2050, 80% of the world's population over 60 will be living in developing countries. What sort of older age can they look forward to?
Does the need for hospice care seem a distant reality to you? Or is it something you have thought about and which you or your loved ones might need one day?
The Commission will draw together existing research, engage and consult the sector through a series of events, and work with voluntary organisations to develop answers as to how the sector can lead the way in adapting to an ageing population.
Older people are going to be the most influential force of change in our society for many years to come. Similar to the rise and impact of youth culture in the 1950s and 60s, the changing demographics of the UK will transform the places where we work and live.
Our aim is to give the sector a gentle kick up the pants. We all know the population will look different in 20 years time and we need to start thinking what that means for charities and their funders now.
In Japan, a country with the fastest growing elderly population in the world, business is booming... for adult nappies. And
Pensions are a great way of providing older people with a minimum income, but their future is far from certain. Most state pensions in Europe tend to be funded through contributions by today's workers.