Alexander Technique

I've always found it remarkable how common it is for people to behave as if gravity is the enemy, and yet we're entirely evolved to interact with it as part of the way we function, no less so than with the air we breathe. Russian scientist and academic P. Anokhin phrased it thus:
Fear of change is why I think people look to others to fix them. They want to get better, but they don't want to change! How is that even logically possible? Change is uncomfortable, often emotionally so. The familiar is so inviting, it's "home".
Old injuries are often hindered from fully healing due to the way we hold tension, and the protection mechanisms we put in place (i.e. tension) for an acute injury often turn into secondary issues later on when we habituate that tension pattern beyond it's initial useful period.
After millions of years of evolution you can rest assured that your postural reflexes work well enough if you don't interfere with them. You could say good posture is simply a lack of bad posture. Although good and bad are such judgemental words. You either have poise or you don't.
When I hurt my foot I don't think I have a hurt foot, I consider that I am hurt. I see it all the time, when someone is in pain they mentally separate that part from their being, as if it's an alien entity.
The myth is that by having a stronger "core" (a poorly defined term anyway) you will have better posture, less back pain, and will perform better in your sporting activities. There's an elephant in the room regarding this too and I'll come back to it later.
By taking some key Alexander Technique principles into your running, it's possible to improve balance, coordination and freedom of movement - all invaluable things for anybody who exercises. And by increasing efficiency in your technique you can also reduce your risk of injury and boost your chance of running faster and more easily than you have ever run before.
Alexander Technique shows that it's our smart, conscious capacity that allows us to prevent and re-route tricky responses before they manifest and it's this that clinches the deal for me, in redefining stress.
There are several causes of period pain, and one of the biggest ones I see is a structural issue also known as a wondering womb. This is where the uterus is no longer in her optimal position, she can be too far forwards, backwards, to one side or another and even flexed over in either of these positions.
It's common to lie like this during an Alexander lesson, whilst a teacher works with you to help you release tension, but it's also just great thing to do for yourself between lessons and as an ongoing practice. And if someone starts to bother you whilst you're doing it, point out to them that you're busy, doctors orders!