Almeida Theatre

There's little that excites me more in theatre than ambitious, thought-provoking productions. In fact, there's only one thing
"My father rode a camel. I drive a car. My son flies a jet aeroplane. His son will ride a camel." A Saudi aphorism Theatre
Depressing times. And a depressing novel. But there is no way this is a depressing show as Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan collaborated to create an electric production that hurtles through its 101 minute running time. This is Orwell on speed.
Boy at Almeida Theatre is painfully beautiful. A play that holds up a mirror to our society and asks, what the hell has become of us?
Leo Butler's play takes a day in austerity Britain and zooms in on one boy. Kind of like a condensed episode of 24, except here Jack Bauer is a marginalised teen called Liam. He's not picking off terrorists; he's w*nking on to trees.
I love Medea. For me, the horror in this story is when you feel her terrible act was not just inevitable but understandable. Even logical. Yet that descent, that terrifying unravelling, is missing in this new production at the Almeida Theatre.
The star draw is Ben Whishaw and, my, he oozes charisma and a beguiling erotic enticement as an effeminate and dangerous Dinoysus, the self-proclaimed God of wine, madness and ecstasy.
It's not just the story that has been overhauled but the production design too. Out have gone the Grecian robes and sandals to be replaced with a sparse set and simple, contemporary clothes.
In London the BAME community account for over 42% of the population, so why aren't the actors taking centre stage reflective of that? If the white able-bodied voice is what fronts the majority of the theatre we experience, we are destined to only ever see life from that perspective and no other.
If theatre is going to thrive then it must take risks. And the Almeida Theatre takes a risk with Game, a thrilling - and chilling - examination of the tipping point of our humanity that doesn't just excite and disturb, but also transforms the experience of theatre itself.