alzheimers dementia

This Dementia Awareness Week we have seen incredible first-person accounts of how creativity and technology can make living with dementia more manageable. Although we don't have a cure for the disease, there are still innumerable ways to bring as much joy as possible to the lives of those living with dementia.
Slowly, painfully slowly, the good days were fewer and fewer, and our visits mainly consisted of us trying to make conversation with someone who barely knew we were there. My grandma would dutifully feed him biscuits when we visited. A woman in the corner of the day room, with white hair that stood on end, screamed periodically like a crowing rooster. The nurses seemed kind.
The Proximity Button is a small badge that is worn by the person with dementia. The Button connects to the Proximity app on the carer's phone via Bluetooth. If the person wearing the Button wanders too far from the carer and their smartphone, it will alarm to alert them. Simple.
Dad's name is one that evokes so much positivity from the generations of people he entertained with series like Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet, Space: 1999 and Thunderbirds. But despite all of those achievements, I am most proud of him for what he achieved while he lived with dementia.
This Christmas thousands of people across the country will be alone; they won't be alone in the conventional sense of not having a place stay, or people to look out for them: they will face exclusion because of an illness that can change the very person they used to be.
I had one last thing to do in London before going home to my parents in Hampshire, and that one thing is to visit my mother-in-law. My MiL is in the grips of Alzheimer's disease. She does not recognise me. She lives in a world where her parents are still very much alive, where she still goes to work. I no longer exist in her world.
A third of Alzheimer's cases are potentially preventable if people improve their lifestyles, according to a new study. Factors
Dementia Awareness Week, organised by the Alzheimer's Society, is this week. It is an annual event designed to shed some light on a condition that is all too often often misunderstood, and to encourage anyone who feels as if they, or someone they are close to, might be suffering with symptoms to take some action.
Carol Rogers, the executive director for Education and Communities at National Museums Liverpool, came up with a project
With dementia affecting about 800,000 people in the UK according to the NHS, there's a high chance that most of us will, at