anne frank trust

We are raising our collective voices and making a noise to remember a young girl, who thanks to the tenacity of her Holocaust survivor father Otto Frank and the publication of her diary, could eventually not be silenced.
It is not a question of whether we can forgive a seemingly unforgivable atrocity; we, as the third party to events, cannot. Yet, the increased interest that forgiveness has been given over the preceding decades, as the post-witness era draws closer, is a telling sign that by exploring forgiveness there may be much to learn.
Anne wrote, "How wonderful it is that no-one need wait, but can start right now to gradually change the world". Anne Frank, as we mark seven decades since your agonised protracted death at Nazi hands, please know that you really did help to change the world.
In an increasingly divisive world, and at a time when Europe is alarmingly turning to nationalism and extremist politicians, this tragic teenager, who died nearly 70 years ago and who never got to live out the life she planned, can do more than many politicians to demonstrate how we should live together as members of one human race.
Last night I went along to the London Jewish Cultural Centre in north London to see a small but compelling exhibition about the capture and trial of Adolf Eichmann and hear the recollections of two people who found themselves very close to the trial.
Well done Beyonce and Jay-Z . We appreciate your visit and, as we reflect on the 69th anniversary of Anne's terrible death in Bergen-Belsen (the actual date will never be known but it was around three weeks before the camp's liberation) I think you are wonderful for reminding the world what Anne Frank is all about.