a&r

Technology ain't what it used to be, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence have dominated the tech landscapes in recent years and as these technologies become more commonplace, consumers from across the spectrum are beginning to see the benefits they can offer
However, there is also much promise, with productivity gap concerns finally sparking further investment in education and skills to combat the UK's longer-term economic pressures. The key for closing our digital skills gap will be ensuring a significant portion of that investment goes towards STEM initiatives in schools. But where to invest?
E-commerce has forever altered customer expectations, but now it's bricks and mortars changing the way we engage with brands. From engineered serendipity to personalised environments, new technologies are giving retailers the opportunity to deliver exciting, unique, and sharable experiences you can't get online or in an app.
At this year's CES, one of the largest global consumer electronics and consumer technology tradeshows, it was announced that augmented reality, virtual reality and artificial intelligence will be the primary disruptive consumer technologies for the next 20 years...
Recently, we undertook research looking at the mobile app habits of UK consumers. Overall the results showed that we're a fickle bunch. We have favourite apps and we like to stick with them. Getting into this list is tough, but that doesn't stop us flirting with alternatives..
It's that time of the year pre-christmas when many a head is full of ideas, swarming with information from dozens of conferences, meet-ups, launches, talks and exhibitions when it's time to cut through the noise and find out what to focus on - some of which you may have heard of and some you definitely won't have. Welcome to Wired 2016.
One of the biggest challenges with new technologies is adoption and integration into our lives, with gamers and proud tech-geeks blazing the trails for society to eventually catch up. But with so many people around the world now sharing a common activity through Pokémon Go...
There is an opportunity to broaden horizons here, but in many ways it emphasises the distance away from these magical places, rather than revealing what children would need to do to have greater social mobility and experience them in the real world.
Ultimately the in-store experience should be there to enhance customer service. These experiences should be extensions of the excellent customer care already being provided. If I visit a store to buy a pair of jeans using the Me-Ality Size-Matching Station but there is no-one to help me find the jeans or make well informed recommendations on products, what's the point?
Children growing up today are past masters at mobile. They're weaned early onto digital, their little minds soothed, calmed and cajoled with touchscreen time. As parents, we marvel at how quickly mere babes in arms master the swipe, double tap and pinch zoom.