art review

Move over Ambromovic; South Africa is taking over.
Santiago Taccetti likes to do things the wrong way. In fact, he has literally made an art of it. His new and first solo exhibition in the UK consists of a series of two-metre high white paintings. But far from manipulating the paint on the canvas in the way painters are supposed to do, Taccetti has produced paintings without paint.
The sculpture is part of an EU Commission-funded project called Changing Tracks involving Catalonia, County Mayo in Ireland and Northamptonshire County Council. All three partners are seeking to engage with new audiences for contemporary art by placing it in unexpected places.
The latest government survey shows that more people than ever are visiting museums and art galleries. However, a closer look at the figures shows that this is not the case with younger people. Dan Baldwin believes the experience of the rock business can help redress this.
The end of another sunny summery week in August offers you a refined colourful selection of creativity and celebration of collaborative minds. Our leading mural in Millie's weekly review comes from NYC, where all-around Renaissance man (artist, toy designer and illustrator)Tristan Eaton delivers this impressively detailed portrait, inspired by the painter's love for comics.
Mark Evans describes himself as a "sculptor within a tenth of a millimetre". The 38-year-old artist's chosen medium is always leather, a textile he finds appealing both aesthetically and functionally. He barely scratches the surface of it to produce illustrations that are dramatic, symbolic and very large.
Vitrine Bermondsey Street's latest exhibition features new paintings by John Walter and encapsulates the ornate, bold and iconoclastic vision of his maximalist aesthetic.
The history of propaganda is just one aspect of the British Library's new exhibition entitled Propaganda: Power and Persuasion. In a series of six sections, it deploys some 200 exhibits - pamphlets, posters, ephemera such as coins and banknotes, quotations, film and interviews - to explore the different ways in which propaganda has been used.
34-year-old London-based Henny Acloque has experienced the death of her father and some close friends over the past five years and the re-evaluation she says to try to take positives from the deaths she believes has fed into her work at least subconsciously. Yet the drawings and paintings of Life After Magic are far from morbid.
Who defines how men should perform themselves to be seen as male in 2013 is the core of this very fine, tight little show.