Arthur Miller

I believe there were three flashpoints in Miller's youth that shaped his entire life's work. The first, and perhaps the most enduring, was the collapse of his father's business during the Great Depression of the late 1920s.
It struck me that Miller was way ahead of his time in his critique of the American dream and capitalism. We exist inside a consumerist bubble full of false images of beauty and success where we've lost touch with what's actually important.
Death of a Salesman is a beautiful play and The RSC version, now transferred to the West End, is a beautiful production that shows this Arthur Miller classic at its very best.
It's interesting what you remember and what you forget about a production. The tension, the gut-wrenching tragedy in the piece is as devastating as when I saw it last year. Yet I'd forgotten how good the sound and lighting design are.
At the heart of this production is an immense performance from Richard Armitage who perfectly captures the profound inner conflict within John Proctor, a man increasingly at odds with both his wife and the society in which he lives.
Michael Gove's intention to axe American Classics (To Kill A Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men and The Crucible) from the GCSE
I am going to stick my neck on the line and say that, right here, right now, A View from the Bridge at the Young Vic is the best show in London.
How do we promote tolerance and protect free speech in a time where organised groups openly, and others clandestinely, exploit our liberal values to oppose our aims, sometimes with the deadliest of means?
Stolen days of romance with the world's most alluring and desired woman - these may sound like words from a fairytale, but