aspiration

Often January can start full of good intentions but it's not uncommon to soon fall back into old habits, especially if some of our plans hit obstacles. Then we can end up berating ourselves, feeling a failure and becoming disappointed at our lack of progress.
High performance is a truly special state achieved by very few and within a clearly defined context. It's a worthwhile thing to aspire towards achieving but let's not be naive in thinking it's possible for everyone.
In this country, after centuries of struggle and strife, we the Labour movement finally created social mobility - the realisation and entrenchment of the British dream. Now it is our duty to protect it.
What concerns me is that the fulfilling of potential that many of mine and older generations have benefited from is becoming more and more difficult, not just in London but across the country. That's why, as Mayor, I will ensure more affordable homes are built, and establish a Living Rent, why I will push the Living Wage and encourage enterprise, and why I will make sure people can afford to get to and from work on reliable affordable public transport. Without these things, aspiration simply gets crushed from the reality of living in London.
There is a real problem for the Labour Party over aspiration and social mobility - and it goes to heart of the major fault lines that exist in its founding... The Labour Party and the trade union movement have a proud record of helping the aspirational. They should be making more of it, not less if it. And Sadiq Khan should be celebrating the social elevation that aspiration and perspiration brought to his life. Without it he would not be a prospective candidate to replace Boris. And we, the public, would not have been able to decide on his merits, or otherwise in the forthcoming mayoral race.
The seduction of becoming rich has the power to grip the imagination and inspire endless daydreams of 'making it big'. Moreso for those from less privileged backgrounds, the prospect of escaping the struggles of financial lack can drive a particularly all-encompassing pursuit of large living.
I was lucky enough to spend some time recently travelling around India, which was a wonderful experience.
I was speaking at the 30% Club from "Schoolroom to Boardroom" seminar: an afternoon where new initiatives which target young women, at school, university and early careers, were being launched. Needless to say, I was a small fish in a very big pond. Or, to continue the rowing analogy, a novice in a Blues boat.
The motto of 'Making the Impossible Possible' has stuck with me and remains central to my own working ethos. I strongly believe if you really want something, it is possible to get it but you have to put in the work and commitment to achieve the impossible and make it possible.
Former children's minister Tim Loughton said last week that improving educational outcomes is the key to tackling youth unemployment. He's absolutely right, and it is early intervention programmes like ours that can help to ensure the most disadvantaged young children and teenagers are able to achieve their full academic, and personal, potential.