Aung San Suu Kyi

Baroness Warsi also savages muted response of Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson
Almost 400 people have died in the recent unrest, with the Burmese military accused of committing crimes against humanity
The minority of Myanmar, known as the Rohingya, is being violently attacked with impunity and driven from their homes. The mass killings, setting of human beings on fire and raping of women and young children is being carried out against the Rohingya minority in the Rakhine state of Burma, but the dreadful plight of the Rohingya is going unnoticed by world at large.
While much of the media - especially in the Anglophone world - has been focusing on the American election and the implications of Donald Trump's victory, there's been a new outbreak of violence in western Myanmar that needs urgent attention before it escalates and undermines the country's ongoing reform process.
Daniel Johnson's lecture is well worth reading in its entirety - and that fresh vision of a positive politics is worth searching for. There is light, if we seek it, to contrast the current grim reality of so much of the world's politics. Let's think what we are for, as well as what we are against.
Article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that all individuals have rights based upon their race, colour
As a Buddhist, I have spent the last month - to the surprise of many - visiting the morning and evening prayers at my local mosque during this holy month of Ramadan. In brutal contrast, this morning I woke up to the news that my fellow Buddhists in Southeast Asia had just razed a local mosque to the ground.
Last week, Burma's first civilian President in half a century was inaugurated. Htin Kyaw is the first democrat, and perhaps the first good man, to lead Burma's government since General Ne Win ousted prime minister U Nu in a coup in 1962. So last week should have been a time of celebration, marking the achievement of a struggle for democracy that has gone on for decades. Or so many think.
It is not, nor should it be, the responsibility of women alone to fix a world that so often acts to their detriment. But, on International Women's Day, the work of fearless and determined women such as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi inspires millions around the world who are striving against oppression and for justice, equality and freedom.
It seems fitting that this was the year the movie Suffragette came out. It was a reminder of how far women have travelled