autism parenting

Whether your child has special needs or not, you do not parent exactly the same as a friend would. As all people with autism are different, parents are too and because one strategy or style works for one parent, doesn't mean it has to for you. Don't feel afraid to be different yourself.
My son is not a problem. He is not a health and safety risk, a difficulty to manage or an obstacle to overcome. He is not a disability. He is not a neurodevelopmental condition. He is a little boy who fears and loves, who laughs and cries.
I was experiencing life as many mums do in that I felt I was there to service Joseph's basic needs; toileting and feeding. My gut instinct told me that if I wasn't there to do it then anyone else would be able to fill the gap. I'm certain Joseph liked me but it never felt anything more greater than that.
Transitions to adulthood are a vital area where much more needs to be done. There is very little information on whether children find it easier to work in certain professions (for example ones where routine and structure is required). Only by learning more about how autistic children do later in life can we make sure that their education is sufficiently tailored to maximise the chances of them entering the workplace successfully. Only a combination of more resources, more dedication, more support and more understanding will help ensure that every autistic child lives a life worth living.
My four-year-old son is screaming. The noise is relentless, high-pitched - almost painful. It reverberates in my chest and sets every nerve on edge. He has been screaming for half an hour. He can barely keep it up but there is no way for him to stop. It is visceral.
I don't see my son's autism as bad thing, nor do I see it as a superpower. My innate operating system is Windows 8. He runs on OS X. I basically understand OS X, it just takes me a while to sometimes 'get' it. He thinks Windows 8 is fucking idiotic and makes no sense whatsoever. Perhaps he has a point.
The Boy lurches towards the woman's leg and grabs her ankle. "Owwwwww!" she shouts as The Boy scratches her. "I'm so sorry. He has autism and doesn't understand why I'm stopping him standing next to the window, where he always stands." Still nothing. Just a stare boring into my soul, whilst leg rubbing. They're looking at me like I'm the most abhorrent parent in the universe.