avaaz

Hundreds of Britons are calling on the government to take in more refugees, with some even offering their homes as the numbers
For Greece and Italy, a breakthrough can't come too soon. This year alone, 100,000 refugees have arrived on the southern shores of Europe. With the UN saying there are a record number of people displaced by conflict this year, this crisis isn't going away anytime soon.
Around the same time that a snake was gobbling up a sleeping drunkard in India last week, several artists and dignitaries assembled for a wine and cheese evening in the safe environment of the Polish Embassy in London. The reason for this gathering was to celebrate the city of Edinburgh's recent decision to approve construction of a monument to a bear with a storied past.
There was an in-depth look at global campaigning movement Avaaz in Sunday's Observer. Its founder, Ricken Patel, was interviewed about how it builds movements online to secure change. It was a generally fascinating piece, but the headline was bothersome to me...
Are you persuasive and stubborn? Do you care about things? That's probably most of us, at times. Well then, you could be a campaigner. In the UK - and it appears across the world - campaigning has gone mainstream.
It is modern life's great irony that, in a world that is better connected than ever before, we have become more incapable of that central pillar of communication: conversation.
We all feel pain when we see the pictures of the gassed children in Syria. We all want the civil war in Syria to end soon; this terrible war that has already been going on for two years, has forced millions to flee and has killed over a hundred thousand people.
Climate change negotiations have concluded in Doha, Qatar as the 'Doha Gateway' was passed within minutes and with much confusion. The outcome represents a historic shift with the introduction of "loss and damage" into the agreement, but will do little to actually limit warming to 1.5 degrees. 
A law that allows authorities to take websites offline and force them to close has come into effect in Russia. The legislation
Fighting continues to rage in Syria amid claims the government is targeting hospitals in Aleppo. Syria's second city is one