Awareness

Given that 1 in 4 people will suffer from a mental health condition at some point in their lives, we most likely all know somebody who will experience anxiety and/or depression. We may even be that quarter of the population. When depression and anxiety hit, it can hit hard.
Being in an abusive relationship is like being outside and alone in a hurricane. The insults, criticism and threats weather you over time. Your worst fears and memories used against you, leaving you feeling raw and exposed. You're exhausted from all the fighting and chaos, but you just have to keep dodging obstacles.
It isn't about being confident in a bikini, it's about addressing the shame, embarrassment and lack of knowledge that women routinely experience when something goes wrong inside their pelvis (ovaries, womb, cervix, vagina) or between their legs (the vulva). This is body shaming of a different kind - internal, specific to women's reproductive health and genitals.
William needs 24/7 care, but he loves being with people, whether they are children or 'grown-ups'. If you're (not) expecting a child with cerebral palsy you won't be expecting the feelings of relief, comfort and happiness when you see them build relationships with adults who want to help them as much as you do.
Research has broken the sound barrier. Research has produced plants that can tolerate drought. Research has made space exploration a feasible reality. Research makes the impossible, possible and one day, research will beat blood cancer.
The Dementia Statements, for all their common sense, really need to become commonplace. They need to be ingrained into every care and support service and every community.
If you're looking for a powerful tool to propel yourself into action, try writing things down! Just in case you needed some persuasion, here are 5 good reasons why writing things down could be your first action step to making changes
everybody banner Imagine you're 28, developing your career, relationships, trying to get on the property ladder and starting to make your way in the world. Then you're diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, the most widespread disabling neurological condition for young people around the world, for which there is currently no cure. That was me in 2008.
Anyway you look at it, beliefs about stabilising the core in order to get strong, protect the spine and have a good posture are rampant among friends, in communities, in society and in the media. Why on earth wouldn't you follow advice that appears to be endorsed by everyone, everywhere?
I'm a 29-year-old mental health nursing student from the University of South Wales, and I've been the sole carer for my mother, who has terminal cancer and is now receiving palliative care at home.