b2b

Yesterday morning I sat in a classroom with 30 kids - all 13-year-olds. They were uncannily silent. Along the corridor, in
Put a pin in the calendar and you'll always find an award ceremony for something or other - you can tell by the turnout, the extravagance and fanfare of a ceremony like the Oscars, that no matter how successful you are, everyone likes the recognition of an award.
There's no question that cloud computing now plays a big role in most of our lives, although many people may not even realise it. Mobile phones, computers, games consoles, cars, connected appliances, watches... the list goes on.
To be a master marketer, you have to be a master of content. But the 2014 forecast study by the CIM reported that only "44% of B2B marketers have a documented content strategy". The numbers suggest that thinking caps aren't on - marketers are pushing out content to tick boxes but floundering when it comes to producing strategic material that helps to achieve real business objectives.
What makes us as consumers choose one brand over another? Is it the price? Is it the software? Or does it simply come down to our own preference? It is fair to say that we have, in today's society, become inundated with choices. The question is therefore; when it comes to technology, and more specifically 'essential technology', what makes a consumer choose one product over another?
Data has always been important in communications, but it has never been more critical than it is now. In today's world, newspapers are facing increasing pressure to cut costs and produce more news in less time.
According to Danish academic and renowned futurist of the digital age, Thomas Pettitt's we have left behind the Gutenberg Parenthesis - the period after Gutenberg's invention of the printing press in the 15th century to the present day - and we are now living in a Pre-Gutenberg time.
B2B sales and marketing has had to wake up a bit. No longer is it about pouring badly targeted messages through fax machines
Freddie Ossberg, Founder and CEO of Raconteur Media and winner of Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2010, gives tips on putting
If you walk into Starbucks and ask for a cheeky hazelnut latte, then the barista making your coffee will ask you your name. Alan, you will reply, or Rosie, or Lord Voldemort if you're feeling silly - and then they will put your name on the cup, ready for you to pick up.