badger

Before any wildlife intervention is authorised, particularly one which will see a protected native species being blown to pieces in large numbers by gunmen at night in our countryside, there are surely a number of basic criteria that should be satisfied.
Therese Coffey said during the debate that Britain has the highest animal welfare standards in the world. When it comes to snares, that's utter nonsense - we're practically alone in Europe when it comes to allowing their use. I believe that it's time for the Government to back up those words with action. It's time for a ban on snares.
Politicians, farmers leaders, and particularly veterinarians, should know better.
Badgers have friends and those friends vote. No longer can politicians arrogantly cook up backroom deals with farming and landowning interests to destroy badgers, without paying a high political price.
A group of 26 eminent scientists and vets have written to the Prime Minister, urging his government to abandon badger culling and instead focus on cattle-based measures to control the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle.
Badgers are our largest surviving carnivore and have lived in our landscape for over half million years. Some badger setts in our countryside are over 500 years old and date back to the Elizabethan era. However our relationship with this iconic species has often been savage and cruel.
Read our 12 fun facts and then vote in our poll! So tell us...
SEE ALSO: Government's Badger Cull Tactic Unveiled
All rumours and intel suggest that the controversial badger cull looks set to start this Bank Holiday Monday. Whilst many will be enjoying BBQs, weekends away or even just some good old Bank Holiday DIY, others will be cleaning their rifles, sorting their body bags, putting on their hunting gear and heading to the South West.
Fresh from the horse meat scandal, DEFRA has found itself in a new controversy, having again failed the British consumer in food traceability and labelling. The public now knows that over 20,000 cattle infected with bovine TB enter the food chain in the UK each year, and the government doesn't know where they go, where they are sold, and who is eating them.