bariatric surgery

Weirdly, a study shows that it may help your love life if you're single, but could harm it if you're not!
On the 28 November 2015, I underwent weight loss surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy or a gastric sleeve. I wrote about why I needed this operation in my previous blogs, "My Gastric Sleeve and Me" and My Gastric Sleeve and PCOS.
On the 25th of November 2015, I has weight loss surgery. I underwent a sleeve gastrectomy, also known as a gastric sleeve. It has now been just over 3 months since my surgery and I have lost nearly 30 kg. YAY!
On the 28th of November this year, I underwent a sleeve gastrectomy, a type of bariatric surgery where 85% of my stomach was removed, leaving what is known as a gastric sleeve.
As time goes on, I know for a fact that I will be congratulated on how well I look and how slim I have become and be told I have done well, but the minute that it is known that I have cost the NHS in the region of £8,000 people's opinion of this weight loss will change.
So I have now decided that after the surgery and the following weight loss it will be time for wholesale change. I have a bucket list of sorts, not to do before I kick the thing but more to do with the chance that now I possibly could.
I am currently awaiting Bariatric Surgery and whilst doing so appear to have some time on my hands, mostly spent trying to keep my mind off food. This time will be spent wisely or it will be spent blogging and I fear the second option will win.
Rather than championing dangerous and butchering weight loss procedures - which by the way are offered privately without any mental health assessments or help - shouldn't we be asking for a long term solution to better our health not 'fixing' a 'problem' that wont go away unless tackled at the root cause?
The latest in quick fix diets, this pill, once swallowed and inflated is the latest mini gastric balloon. It's being hailed as a miracle pill - but really isn't it just vanity gone mad? The pill is designed for people a stone overweight. You know, the kind of people who could tweak their diet a bit and maybe hit the gym for an extra day a week in order to lose 'that' stone.
In the UK, as the obesity rates soar and healthcare costs rise, the government is contemplating putting a "fat tax" on food in England. Will this succeed in encouraging people to make healthy choices or will it drive them to buy cheaper, lower quality foods?