behavioural economics

Research has found that humans lived a happier existence in past cultures. Back in the day, people who were respected and praised for being a good craftsman, a patriot, a saint, an upright citizen, etc were most happy.
One winter's day in 1961, Professor Edward Lorenz - one of the first meteorologists to use computer-based prediction - decided to run a weather simulation in his MIT lab. He'd run this one before, so he was pretty sure he knew what to expect. But on this occasion, to save time, he inputted the data using three decimals places, rather than six as he had used originally. So, for example, 23.348 rather than 23.347813: a difference of just 0.000187.
The Verve song, "Bitter Sweet Symphony", is famous for its haunting chorus, infamous video and the Rolling Stone's accusations
The levy (dubbed a 'sugar tax') will be introduced in April 2018, and will hope to generate close to £1.5 billion in the period 2018-21. The government intends to invest the tax revenue for increased physical education, extracurricular activities and breakfast clubs at schools.
As change practitioners there's a lot of value in understanding a little about the fascinating field of Behavioural Economics
We all have habits that we want to change: eat less, exercise more, stay out of our overdrafts; but this is easier said than done. Why is it that bad habits are so hard to break and new 'good' behaviours are so hard to stick to?
The next big win for the planet may not be a field of solar panels or a new emissions cap. It may well be people themselves, motivated to become better climate stewards than their neighbours down the block.
Why is it that policy relating to personal data seems to generate so much controversy? Take the recent huge public outcry over care.data which resulted in massive negative media coverage, questions in Parliament and subsequent delays to what many consider to be an important program for the well-being of the nation's health.
Have you ever wondered how to change what people do? How to help them make "better" choices? How to kick bad-habits? How to avoid the pitfalls of stereotypes?
Why are some products more successful and appealing than others? Which product features and design aspects influence the way we feel about products? And how can we leverage accumulating insights from behavioural science to improve product offerings?