Beirut

Driving in a new country is always a tricky business, least of all when, even though there are lights, no one's paying attention to them. I recently got behind the wheel in Beirut and I'd be lying if I said the car remained unscathed. I'm a survivor, though, and these are my nine tips to negotiating congested roads, dodging potholes and BlackBerry using ladies who can't see you.
Beirut hostage Terry Waite will be a guest speaker at an international victims of terror conference in Northern Ireland this
So it finally happens, nearly a year after the doomsayers said it was inevitable, that the violence in Syria slips over the border into Lebanon. While there have been occasional skirmishes in the north for months, the developments in the past fortnight suggest an increase in the dangers for the Lebanese.
Each year the Lebanon Mountain Trail Association organises a hike along the whole trail, which takes a month, but it also caters for those who just want to spend a few days exploring the path. I joined them for a two-day hike from Baskinta to Hrajel.
On my final night in Beirut, we went out to dinner at a restaurant that specialises in Chocolate dishes. If your sole intake of chocolate for three months has been Ferrero Rocher, then you are to endorphins what insomnia is to sleep - utterly deprived.
War pays I can tell you. Kabul is a building site and the construction industry is booming off the back of reconstruction. Now Mr David Cameron of the swept back hair and boyish looks, you're a clever man, just this week you flew over Afghanistan, did you perchance bother to look out of the window? If you had you would have seen how capitalism really works.
So those of you who know and care, which excluding my mum is no telephone directory, will be aware that last week was to 'close' what Gillette are to shaving - a whisker away!
While their brothers and sisters in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere mark the first anniversary of the Arab Spring, the people of Lebanon are commemorating the progenitor of these momentous events.
Dye illegally dumped by a factory is apparently responsible for turning the Beirut River an eerie shade of blood red. An
With the Iranians and Hezbollah backing the Syrian regime while the US, Israel and Saudi Arabia put pressure on Assad to go Syria is becoming the scene of world struggle.