Blockbuster Films

This mind-bending, psychological-thriller is a far cry from sky-diving monarchs and jitterbugging nurses, but Boyle hasn't completly reined in his penchant for spectacle.
There are a wealth of problems with Stolen; whether it's the grainy aesthetic that screams "straight to DVD', the dated soundtrack that sounds like a 1990's video game, the terrible script, or Josh Lucas' spectacularly over-the-top acting, but there is something in its stubbornness to elevate itself beyond its pulp framework that is admirable.
You could smell the jasmine as Amitabh Bachchan engaged Steven Spielberg in a lively conversation. The 30-minute conversation anchored by Big B saw Steven Spielberg at his charming best. He is a genius behind the camera and an extraordinarily humble and witty conversationalist in front of it.
Films like Red Dawn should not be judged on their politics, no matter how ridiculous they are, it should be judged on the quality of film-making. In this area, it is a failure. Aside from the special effects, which are neat, if a little underwhelming, the pacing, structure and characterisation are poor to non-existent.
Given we are in an age where traditional media, entertainment and communications are all being bulldozed by a digital, non-location specific cloud approach, standing there with arms crossed refusing to let this international celebration of film spread its glory globally, looking much like an incorrigibly stubborn little Oscars statue, is surely quite backwards.
We should, I think, cut Hollywood some slack. It is easy to forget that history is all about dramatic license. Who wants to read a boring account of the past? Which historian does not want to spice things up? And even as far as flaws, errors and distortions go - well, bring them on.
Ok... I was waiting for the funny to happen... and it never showed. We're used to it, I suppose... we suffered the unbearable Ricky Gervais as host for far longer than we should have had to. But... wow... wasn't Seth MacFarlane awful?
This year's Oscars ceremony was unique in many respects. Ang Lee's Namaste only highlighted this uniqueness. Although the function itself was very much American in its outer trappings, the spirit reflected the effect of globalising on one of the most prestigious film awards.
MacFarlane will never be everyone's cup of tea, but the show's organisers would have known this.