bonuses

Ministers have ordered a crackdown on public sector bonuses following the uproar over six figure sums awarded to senior bankers
Banking giant Barclays slashed the bonus pool for its investment banking arm by 32% in 2011 to £1.5 billion amid mounting
Private sector banks, as well as the state-backed Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group, have a responsibility
Labour has claimed the government can do more to block bonuses for Network Rail chiefs, the day after Justine Greening pledged
I don't sympathise with someone for obtaining a multi-million pound pay packet, but I do sympathise with someone if they are bombarded with a constant stream of abuse on an unfair basis.
We are told that this has all been done for the benefit of the UK, and to stop us falling into further debt, while the rest of Europe just looks at us as though we are that awkward woman that no matter how many drinks you've bought and compliments you give her, still thinks you don't like her. Sigh.
Thus far, the political debate surrounding bankers' bonuses has been as nuanced and subtle as a fart in a lift.
The "vilification" of RBS chief Stephen Hester and intervention over bankers' bonuses is not in the "long-term public interest
With bankers' bonus season in full swing, and thanks to relatively recent European rules, we at least get to see exactly the sort of pay deals being awarded to the top bankers in the City. RBS chief executive Stephen Hester's bonus, which he eventually turned down following public outrage, will be followed by a series of other bonus announcements in the coming weeks.
Everything in moderation, isn't that how the saying goes? If a week can be summarised by its headlines, this week it was everything in moderation except bonuses and fast-food. The remuneration packages offered to Britain's fat cats are hardly a new topic of contention, but RBS chief executive Stephen Hester has become something of a poster child for the subject, making the announcement of his annual bonus a must-debate topic whichever side of the argument you fall and a juicy bone for our politicians to fight over.