book reviews

Quite by chance, I read A Room of One's Own as the first in my journey to read some of the best books of all time. It's one of those books most people (and writers in particular) have heard about and thought they should read, but often put off for another day. I finished the book in a few days - it's slim, but it's good reading.
Reading about the past is one of my favourite...(cough!) past times. I love to read about tales of the human struggle, how people were pitted against the cruelty of the power hungry, blood thirsty psychopaths that have dominated the ranks of the elite for eons; Just because their ancestor had the biggest stick.
Gavin Extence's writing is both witty and sincere, a clique page-turner it isn't. But certainly a more refined novel for the modern man to read at leisure. Many memorable moments you'll feel compelled to share. For instance, when Gabriel Vaughn feels outmaneuvered by a young clergyman it's made the funnier that in fact, he was outbullshited.
Yewtree will go down as being coined the craze of the 10's. Just as hosting a referendum is the new fad to replace 2013's
"inquiry for this and an inquiry for that! Darling we've ran out of milk, we need to open an inquiry!"
It comes then with no great surprise that crime writer Peter Robinson should bestow his beloved detective Banks with such a folly deal of the historic sex crime.
Is there a word more fitting for the cultural climate of Britain in 2016 than pandemonium? When Milton coined that word, it
The fastest selling crime novel of 2015 according to the Sunday Times was I Let You Go written by Clare Mackintosh. It was a huge success. In as little as a year later, Clare's 2nd book, I See You, will be speeding its way on to our book shelves faster than you can say.. Publisher Pressure!
Considering the Women is impressive in the sense that it leaves its dent upon the reader. I came away from my first reading dizzied, imbalanced and ashamed in a way which I have not felt since first encountering the work of Primo Levi.
When good horror and fantastic comedy collides, something really awesome happens. One minute you have them screaming at a
I'm never been exactly sure about how I feel when authors pen their novels around historical figures in fictional plots. Well, I say this having never actually read a book that has even ever done such a thing. Regardless of that fact and slightly odd introduction, I can't help but find it a little bit safe for the writer to choose a writer as their protagonist, fictional or not.
It is from this longing to see these dragons kick them Lannisters back into Westeros' dark ages, that I found myself picking up the Waking Fire by Anthony Ryan, the international bestselling author of Blood Song, with "dar dar, dar dar dar.. DAR!" Ringing its way through the confines of my skull.