boredom

Boredom reminds me of water that's put under pressure in a steam engine - if you open the tank slightly once in a while to release the pressure, the water will eventually all boil away, and the engine won't work. But if you keep it under pressure all the time, the steam might become so intense that it will make the engine work and the machine will start moving.
It always makes my ears itch when someone says "I'm boooooooored!" If I'm honest, I'd love to know what that feels like. But I'm a busybusybusy girl. I've always got stuff to do. I need about 362 hours in every day and the list of ideas, thoughts, interests and possibilities just keeps growing.
Staying active over the years is the first step to helping maintain mobility and independence for all of us. Your wellbeing and fitness will improve your quality of life and could make your later life and eventually your retirement less of a myth and more of a dream!
Life is full of moments which were always considered 'dead time': the walk to the station or the doctor's waiting room. This dead time may have felt irritating, but it created space in our lives for meditative thinking. The next time life creates an opportunity for dead time, seize it with both hands. Leave your phone in your pocket, the radio off, and allow your idle mind to wander, to experiment and to be brilliant.
Some people are so averse to being alone with their own thoughts that they would rather undergo physical pain. Yet, in recent times... boredom has been lifted out of the depths of the uncool and has been placed in the realm of art.
So it turns out we really hate spending time with our own thoughts, so much so in fact that we'd rather send electric shocks
If you're bored of routine, try doing the same thing, differently. Change the way and the time when you do the dishes or laundry. Do you drive the same way to work? Maybe take a different route. Eat the same food at the same restaurant? Try something completely new.
I remembered my own childhood: the long and quiet (and sometimes lonely) moments, when I sat in my room or by the window and did NOTHING. Staring out of the window, a bit of day dreaming, watching people and cars passing by... being bored. At the same time I enjoyed exactly those moments. So peaceful and calm, so relaxing and refreshing at the same time.
What my sentient self does find troubling is the teetotal banality that accompanies a clinical trial. For ten days I will be quarantined in a room with no windows, no company and, terrifyingly, no alcohol other than the traces of solution used to sterilise the plethora of needles going in and out of my veins.
I thought I had moved on, until technology brought it all back in reverse focus: to my self. And, now that these pictures I take of my reflection have been officially recognised as an art form, it's made taking self-portraits even more weirdly appealing.