broadcast

There is still some way to go before this futuristic vision is a reality, but the technology exists today - and all that remains is to make the right connections. We are tantalisingly close to a world where news can be broadcast instantly - 24 hours a day, from anywhere in the world - the moment it breaks.
The medley of today's media is unprecedented. While Britain's biggest publishers find themselves in similarly unparalleled levels of turmoil - shrinking revenue, the threat of state regulation, and a growing tendency to aim their guns at each other - the range of outlets beneath them is fragmenting like light through a prism.
In 2012 I wrote an article discussing the ever growing video platform 'YouTube', and how it arguably has grown into the new TV. Since then I constantly rethink how within that time YouTube has still continued to grow...
Benedict Cumberbatch is one of the most influential people working in the British entertainment industry - and no, it's not
For Bart Simpson read Christina Hendricks; for Graham Gooch, Lewis Hamilton. Sky's halcyon days of the nineties are back like the ghost of a svelte Richard Keys. We're about to see if the March of 2012 buys them another twenty years to finally usurp all in British broadcasting.
Amid all the complaining and bragging about who was ranked higher than who when it was published last week, some women on Twitter pointed out that "only one woman made it into the top 20 at all."
Broadcasts from Colonel Gaddafi have provided the Libyan revolution with one of its more bizarre features. Whether denying