Broadcasting

The Committee suggests that the licence fee should be extended to cover catch-up TV and that some BBC services might be provided on subscription. But beyond this it recommends only "careful thought".
Is Rona Fairhead doomed to be the very last chair of the BBC Trust? The chair is a basket-case of a job in which you can please no one, achieve nothing and the chances are high that you'll end up wondering why you ever applied in the first place.
Whilst I'm not a fan of positive discrimination, women's sport needs a platform to highlight its achievements and to encourage change. The recipients of next week's awards are the trailblazers that will get us there. Maybe in the future we won't need women's only sport awards, but right now without it some of
The job of chairman of the BBC Trust is up for grabs. On paper it looks like a dream job. Not too taxing; perks of being a civil servant; good pay; great working environment; interesting, high-profile, semi-altruistic organisation. However, unless you've been living on Mars for the last 15 years, you'll know that this is, in fact, the job from hell.
As a feminist, I do feel frustrated by the lack of women in broadcasting but also think exploration of masculinity is just as valid as that of femininity. One is as important, complex and relevant as the other.
Picture it. The kitchen radio, a glistening hunk of bakelite, its alignment of valves producing a sound that commanded attention. You're a kid busy hanging onto your mother's skirt as she cooks the evening meal. It's a moment of inspiration.
Before you splutter all over the comments section, let's be clear that the end goal isn't a rigid 50/50 gender split of everything that ever goes on telly. Nobody's advocating shoehorning extra women into every possible scenario, just to make a statement.
Philosopher and author Alain de Botton's narrates a five-minute film for Newsnight, questioning the point of broadcasting
The genius behind this massive endeavour is Chris Morris, who orchestrated it all from his lavish secret office under BBC Broadcasting House.
The broadcasters have always stated that cameras in court will have significant public benefit and give real effect to the right to see justice being done. There will be greater understanding of our justice system on issues such as sentencing or what happens in a court, it will better prepare the public if they have to appear as a witness or juror.