Broadcasting

For the first time in the history of the Olympic Games, fans and commentators will see instant results as events take place
Colonel Gaddafi has issued another message of defiance, calling the overthrow of his regime a “charade, which can only take
Spending watchdog the National Audit Office (NAO) will have full access to investigate the BBC under new rules published
Radio stations, especially big ones like the BBC's national pop network Radio 1, are prepared for bad stuff happening: it's called 'obit procedure'. When a catastrophic news story breaks, such as the death of a royal family member, each network has an audience-appropriate mix of obituary music on standby that will 'reflect the mood of the nation'.
It's great that our elderly statesmen of rock are taking to the airwaves. But I'd like to see a bit of a shake-up in the way the music we hear on our national stations is chosen. I'm specifically thinking about Radio 1 here.
The report suggests that the BBC is keen to preserve BBC3 instead of BBC4. The channel is home of such anti public service programmes as the repellent "Geordie Finishing School For Girls" , as well as "Fast Food Baby" and "Underage and Pregnant".