btb

Following the outbreak of bTB among the hounds of the Kimblewick Hunt near Oxford, reported in the Huffington Post, we have
What the Caffe Nero situation has taught us is that each individual retailer or outlet should stand firmly by their procurement policies - and not differentiate between milk that is and is not perceived to be from the cull areas. This is an approach that will have most force.
A group of 26 eminent scientists and vets have written to the Prime Minister, urging his government to abandon badger culling and instead focus on cattle-based measures to control the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle.
This week heralded an all too familiar event in the UK Parliament - a House of Commons debate on the badger cull. With the second year of culling having very recently completed, politicians and animal lovers alike are eagerly awaiting the news of just how many badgers were killed over the last six weeks in Gloucestershire and Somerset.
All rumours and intel suggest that the controversial badger cull looks set to start this Bank Holiday Monday. Whilst many will be enjoying BBQs, weekends away or even just some good old Bank Holiday DIY, others will be cleaning their rifles, sorting their body bags, putting on their hunting gear and heading to the South West.
The only scientists who are pro-cull are those on the payroll of government or the farming industry. Even the BVA's own vets openly attacked their organisation in the Independent last week, accusing them of bringing their profession into disrepute by the BVA's pro-cull stance.
On 1 June licences will be issued for the culling of badgers across pilot cull zones. We really need to look at this as a 'grave crime'. It's not only a crime against wildlife, it's a crime against science and a crime against public opinion - that which the government is supposed to represent.