burundi

'Shoot!' yells Karina, a tall, athletic 15-year-old Burundian as she launches a ball in my direction. I grab it, go for the
National foreign policy and alliances must be rooted in democratic governance and human rights.
f these day to day deaths happened in the UK we'd be outraged and I think a time is coming, as we get more globally connected, when we'll feel the urgency, as we see those like us struggling to survive. Extreme poverty really is the daily emergency of our times.
As I lay in my darkened room I came to an important conclusion. In the US, medicine is a commercial enterprise and in the UK it's a social enterprise. But in Africa medicine is hugely dependent on aid enterprise.
My charity Send a Cow, is currently one of a number signed up to Global Poverty Project's Live Below the Line campaign. It encourages people to live for five days on what the world's poorest survive on for a lifetime. In the UK that means eating and drinking on £1 a day.
That is exactly what happened in South Sudan in February when elections due to take place this June were suddenly postponed for two years, a move barely reported upon by the world's media or its leaders.
Through a collection of photographs and interviews, Crossings: The journey to peace challenges predominant narratives about eastern DRC, which focus on 'conflict trade' and 'rape' above broader lived experiences.
As the founder of FXB International, a non-governmental organisation dedicated to lifting people out of extreme poverty, and its FXBVillage programme, my mission was to provide a solution to the key drivers of extreme poverty through a holistic and self-sustaining approach.
In an ideal world, we would be able to alleviate the all humans from poverty. The sad truth is however, that we, as individuals and nation states, have limited resources. Oxford Union voted that we should indeed help the Burundians before the British. But such a conclusion is naïve and idealistic.