byod

If you saw someone walking down the street with their open wallet or purse in full view, you'd think they were being reckless. Who would just leave their personal belongs out for anyone to see or take? As individuals, we're conscious of the dangers of theft and conditioned to be careful with our belongings - but when it comes to our connected devices, any semblance of caution seems to disappear.
Everyone wants to stay constantly connected but at what cost? They're so easy to disguise. Slipping a phone out of a pocket to read a text takes a couple of seconds, but it's a significant distraction. There's the issue of the digital divide.
In order to prevent online fraud, it is important for businesses to recognise where their infrastructure is most vulnerable, educate employees effectively and work with the right partners to keep up with an evolving cyber security landscape.
Mobile devices have become an extension of our everyday lives. Whether we're checking the news, browsing an online shop or catching up with loved ones on social networks - there's no denying that our handheld devices make our lives much more convenient...
As the transition away from relatively easy to manage corporate laptops and desk-bound computers, personal tablets and smartphones gathers pace, it's no surprise that hackers are choosing these mobile devices as their next target.
While smart phones, tablets and laptops are becoming our 'go-to' devices, creating a boon in productivity, the move towards Bring Your Own Device is increasing security risk to the corporate network and corporate data.
Fast broadband means that the location of a business can now be more of a lifestyle choice. Geography simply no longer is a constraint. Today, according to the FSB, half of all Scottish businesses are home-based, for example, sustaining nearly one in five private sector jobs in Scotland.
Here are my predictions for 2015, which focus on the upcoming challenges of "BYOIoT" in the work place, securing the connected vehicle and the opportunities for everything from healthcare to the supply chain.
What makes us as consumers choose one brand over another? Is it the price? Is it the software? Or does it simply come down to our own preference? It is fair to say that we have, in today's society, become inundated with choices. The question is therefore; when it comes to technology, and more specifically 'essential technology', what makes a consumer choose one product over another?
While it's clearly an IT issue, BYOD is increasingly creeping onto the FD agenda; in part given the implications for procurement and claims from Cisco, among others, that BYOD reduces the overall cost to business.