Carbon Tax

Whether the SNP is bold enough to go further into the political hot potato of carbon taxing remains unclear. Time is of the essence and she was right to point out that countries should not be making impressive targets for the next two decades - but rather requires urgent action in the next two years. Nicola has raised the bar for the UK, and it will be interesting to see if Teresa May can meet her there with some ambitious policies of her own.
The five things you need to know on Wednesday, February 1… 1) 50 WAYS TO LEAVE A BROTHER The historic The EU (Notification
One thing is for sure: any plan based on restricting access to cheap fuel is doomed to fail from the start, so we have no other choice but to address the problem and create long-term, sustainable solutions.
For as long as oil and gas extraction is taking place, it is right to tax it heavily. These taxes should rightfully be paying to mop up the Thames Valley and the Somerset levels, for sea walls and flood defences wherever our communities need them.
The current governmental landscape betrays a belief that it is possible to run with the hare and the hounds ad infinitum when it comes to energy, and this simply isn't the case. Giving with one hand and taking with the other not only demonstrates a disingenuous attitude that further belittles trust, it also harms investment and makes us less competitive on the world stage.
With accelerated changes to our climate, urgent action is required by the EU to end all tax breaks for aviation. The tax loopholes have no demonstrable benefit for European citizens, also apply to foreign tourists and airlines and lead to all of us, rich and poor, to involuntarily subsidise those who fly through lower take home pay.
The number of UK children living in fuel poverty has risen to 1.6 million as British Gas revealed they made £606 million
There are huge and exciting business opportunities in the development of low carbon technologies, which we must seize on immediately.
As the election results started to come in on Tuesday night, the world held its breath and questioned whether it would avoid