care crisis

Whenever we make mistakes, it is important that we take responsibility and set them right. When Government makes mistakes, it is essential that they do the same. This is particularly the case when the mistakes made by Government impact on vulnerable people or on an essential but fragile sector. I doubt anyone finds that a contentious thing to say - it's not hyper partisan or particularly controversial. And yet Government doesn't seem to agree.
Back in 2010 the coalition government asked Andrew Dilnot to lead a commission on care funding. He duly reported in 2011 with his proposals including a cap on the cost of care. The government - rightly in my opinion - then in 2015 decided not to implement the cap, set at £72,000, and 'postponed' its implementation until 2020.
The government has recognised that care is in crisis. The Budget has provided some more 'sticking plaster' emergency funding for care via local authorities. How that £2 billion will be distributed and used over the next three years remains to be seen.
By all means have a debate on whether we should raise more taxation from income or wealth, but let's do it as part of a debate about government finances. Enough of the dead cats and red herrings! It's time for a new vision for better care and support.
An extraordinary second Monday in December may have heralded long-awaited government action to tackle the care crisis. With more than a million older people not getting the help they need and cash-strapped local authorities squeezing fees to fragile care businesses, the care system seems close to collapse. Now all eyes are on the government's funding settlement for councils later this week. Will it simply allow councils to raise council tax to fund care or will it offer something more fundamental?
By the time the Chancellor got on his feet to deliver the Autumn Statement, expectations of any extra funds for care were very low. The fact that nothing was unveiled confirmed how far care still has to go to win political support.
There is a common refrain in the care sector: we need a cross-party commission/agreement to tackle the care crisis. There
On Monday the Chancellor announced that the Department for Communities and Local Government has agreed to cut 30% out of its budget by 2020. This means that the future of the social care system has just moved from "critical" to full blown "crisis". The crisis will only be averted if the Chancellor moves quickly and ends the long-term financial uncertainty in the social care system in his Comprehensive Spending Review on November 25th.