Care International

In a settlement outside Burao, Somaliland's second largest town, a savings association set up by CARE International and run entirely by local women was providing them not only with status and a voice in the community but also emergency support. Zeinab, one of CARE's female project officers, explained how women pay regularly on behalf of their families into the shared scheme. In normal times, the association can provide loans for entrepreneurial ventures such as small shops. During times of crisis such as severe drought, the collected funds offer a form of insurance for the most vulnerable.
With a name like Rosa perhaps you'd think she has no choice - her namesakes Rosa Parks and Luxemburg were two revolutionary heroines in the fight for global justice and equality. But becoming a mum has given me further reasons for wanting to make sure my baby (and her dad) attended the Walk in Her Shoes rally and march on Sunday 6 March - my very first mother's day as Mum.
When a charity video starts to go viral you know something is up. As part of its contribution to the 16 Days of Activism
The coup d'etat that took place in Central African Republic two years ago this week has affected nearly the entire population, leaving over half of it (over 2.5 million) in dire need of assistance. Over 450,000 people have fled the country with almost as many internally displaced.
New York, 25 September 2015. There is no denying the fundamental and inextricable link between climate change and development
Before this conflict started in December, there was no inspiring and unifying vision of what South Sudan could be. The hope and optimism that came with independence is gone. Instead, there is now fear, mistrust and disillusionment between the people of South Sudan. An amazing opportunity has been squandered. It may take years to re-build a sense of unity.
Contrary to public perceptions, the majority of Syrian refugees do not live in formal refugee camps like Zaatari and the soon-to open Azrak camp. In fact 80% live in towns and cities in Jordan. These urban refugees have reached the limits of their ability to cope.
On this International Women's Day, we are talking about inspiring change. We are looking to challenge the status quo, and that includes the ability to get to a toilet.
Crises at the scale of what has unfolded in Syria and neighbouring countries inevitably upset all norms and test the capacity of all organisations to respond, national or international. There can be no humanitarian solutions for what is fundamentally a political crisis. Yet as we head towards the third anniversary of the uprising in Syria, the international community does need to be asking itself: are we doing enough to assist those affected, and how can we do this better?
According to the latest UN statistics, of the total population affected by Typhoon Haiyan, an estimated 47,600 women are at risk of sexual violence. In the evacuation centres, an estimated 2,250 women are also at risk. We know that disasters impact men and women differently - but how can we get better at factoring this into account in international aid efforts?
On this important day, I urge that we don't forget the plight of the Syrian people who have already suffered so much, and help those most in need: over 1.6million Syrian refugees as well as nearly seven million Syrians who are not refugees but are in urgent need of help inside Syria.
A remarkable revolution is taking place in finance, not in the City, but under the shade of large communal trees in villages across Africa and the developing world. It's a savings revolution, and one with the potential to pump $157 billion into the global economy, and particularly developing nations, if the 2.7bn adults worldwide who are 'unbanked' participate in savings-led microfinance programmes.
Instead, what we witnessed was an almost unprecedented and united stand by the world's poorest and most vulnerable countries, together with their developing country allies, to demand the establishment of an 'international mechanism' to address the significant and increasing loss and damage resulting from climate change impacts.
Worldwide, 2.5billion people are excluded from financial security and the fruits of sound advice on how to better their material condition. The partner is Barclays, beset by problems at home yet doing amazing work here and elsewhere.
You may or may not bemoan the hosepipe ban, but, as you inevitably sip a glass of water with lunch or luxuriate in a bath or take a shower tomorrow, spare a thought for those for whom a fraction of that water could be the difference between life and death; and then do what you can to help.