Charities Aid Foundation (CAF)

While the charity sector strives for equality, representation on charity trustee boards is mainly made up of white, middle aged, men. It is a problem which desperately needs addressing.
UK society would be better if more people gave generously to charity, but how can we achieve this when cultural attitudes are notoriously difficult to shift? With the US being recognised as the most generous country in the world, many argue that we should look at what they do and learn from it.
If the Lobbying Bill comes into effect without an exemption for charities, we believe the UK will damage its reputation for advancing civic freedoms and undermine the nation's "soft power" as a consequence. We have long been admired globally for our enabling environment for civil society organisations, but this Bill would see us following regressive international trends in the relationship between governments and civil society.
For charities working in war zones or countries hit by acts of terrorism, the world can be a dangerous and difficult place. Charities dealing with the humanitarian effects of conflict or political upheaval face the task of making sure help goes to the people who need it most, while not inadvertently supporting armed groups or those involved in terrorism...
A new report we are publishing today lays bare the fact that the bulk of the people power that drives our charities is concentrated in a small minority of people. If you take together donations and time volunteered, we found that nine per cent of people are responsible for two-thirds of this social action in Britain.
Perhaps the most difficult challenge for philanthropy is its uneasy relationship with inequality. It is an uncomfortable truth that inequality is pretty much a necessary precondition for philanthropy.
Public donations to charity fell by 20% last year, receiving a total £1.7 billion less, according to a survey. As recession