child malnutrition

We need to step up and a joined up, multisector approach will go a long way to ensuring that children in the UK have access to the nutrition they need to grow and develop so they can lead a fun-filled life.
I started work this morning feeling disillusioned. A report had hit my desk that painted a very bleak picture of the state
If Theresa May really wanted to tackle the "burning injustices" in society, sorting out the food epidemic in Britain from soil to plate should have been a priority. Instead, we are left with a Prime Minister who was able to identify and commentate on a social truth, but when given the opportunity to put things right, presented the public with a manifesto that perpetuated injustice, punished the poor and ignored the modern scourge of malnutrition now becoming the norm in 21st Century Britain.
Sudan has one of the highest malnutrition rates in the Middle East and North Africa region. For the last forty years, one third of the population has suffered from irreversible chronic malnutrition - a life-long growth condition that has consistently plagued Sudanese children since 1987.
It is sadly true that one of the biggest and most neglected challenges facing the global community is still malnutrition, specifically undernutrition. It affects more people than any single disease and is an underlying cause of nearly half of all child deaths. In the global fight to end suffering and reduce poverty, tackling undernutrition will have a significant and lasting impact.
Hidden hunger is caused by a lack of nutritious food and results in insufficient essential vitamins and minerals being absorbed into the body. It can have long-term, irreversible health effects as well as socioeconomic consequences that can erode a person's well-being and development. By affecting people's productivity, it can also take a toll on countries' economies...
We know that if we can make governments change the way they set their priorities, children's lives will be saved. We need to ensure that the issue of acute malnutrition doesn't only hit the headlines when natural disasters strike or when war erupts.
The treatment of malnutrition has revolutionised over the last few years, with the development of Ready to-Use Therapeutic Foods meaning more children than ever can receive life-saving treatment at home, in the comfort of their own community. However, as I recently discovered when I visited West Pokot in Kenya, there are still a high number of malnourished children who are not yet accessing treatment.
The birth of the Royal baby, Prince George of Cambridge, was a time to celebrate for most of the British public. Unmarred by worries of a traumatic birth in volatile conditions in a country where we are lucky enough to have free access to healthcare. But others are not so lucky. Every day, around 1,000 women die in childbirth or from a pregnancy-related complication.
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) exclusive breastfeeding rates have stagnated, with less than 40% of infants under six months of age being exclusively breastfed.