children's literature

Children, like adults, have the right to see books that reflect the world around them, and the broader world, too. That means, yes, featuring different races, cultures, genders, sexual orientations, religions, abilities, classes, ages, and so on, and also exploring political, moral, physical, and emotional issues
After half an hour waiting in my second cue of the day I was catatonic. The people behind were chatty at first but grew markedly frosty when little Sylvian exclaimed (finger pointing for dramatic effect) she's the one that booed bankers in the Tata tent!
Friday 13 September 2013 is Roald Dahl Day. It falls on the anniversary of his birthday; he would have been ninety-eight. Celebrated today as one of the great British children's authors of the twentieth century, his work is remembered fondly as part of that period of life which is playful, carefree and unburdened by adult responsibility.
One day, books will be like antiques. A standard paperback will cost hundreds of pounds depending on the year and edition. War and Peace will be out of print. And I will be an old lady with only dreams of ghosts of cats, telling the illiterate kids on the block how these same streets were once paved in books, each one costing less than a halfpenny.
It's World Book Day, an annual event designed to encourage parents to read to their kids, as well as an opportunity for children
What I'm thinking about during this particular LGBT History Month is how LGBT sexualities are portrayed in young adult literature. I'm frequently interested in what messages we send to young readers through literature, and I think LGBT literature in particular can be quite a problematic area.
Shan - real name Darren O'Shaughnessy - became a full-time writer at the age of 23, and has since sold over 20 million copies of his books worldwide, becoming bestsellers in the US, UK, Ireland and elsewhere.
The scriptwriter for the Olympic opening ceremony is to jostle with David Walliams for a top children's comedy-writing prize
Michael Rosen is a legend of both children's literature and poetry. He's also a Roald Dahl fan, and has worked with illustrator
Amidst all the wonderful British quirkiness at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games, there was a sequence dedicated both to the NHS and children's literature. This might seem like a strange combination, but director Danny Boyle linked them through the Great Ormond Street Hospital, which focuses on children's healthcare.