Chronic Pain

What might be the basis for not accepting second class health? Perhaps because its as innate to our spiritual sense to feel health is natural as it is politically to demand equal rights. "In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties," mused Swiss poet and philosopher Henri Frédéric Amiele.
Pain creates tension in the body, which feeds back into the brain, which responds by turning up the 'volume' on its pain amplifiers, creating even more suffering.
Imaging studies show that mindfulness soothes the brain patterns underlying pain and, over time, these changes take root and alter the structure of the brain itself, so that patients no longer feel pain with the same intensity. Many say that they barely notice it at all.
How many times have you been asked by a doctor; "On a scale of 1 - 10, how bad is the pain?" Unfortunately I've been asked this question too many times to count. I realise a doctor needs some indication, a clue as to what he/she is dealing with, but I wonder how helpful this unreliable approach really is.
I realise many people have a sacrosanct attitude towards the NHS. However once you scratch under the surface you realise all is not well. With a budget of £130 Billion, there has to be more accountability and improved quality of service delivery.
A rumour going around for, oh, several millennia, is that God's divine m.o. includes sending suffering to teach us to love Him. That view has always mystified me.
One of the biggest success stories in modern medicine of the past 20 years or so has been the development of a new class of drugs for severe rheumatoid arthritis called anti-tumour-necrosis (TNF) therapy.
Discovering you have a chronic health condition can be scary, but it's like finally having the light switched on after wandering around in the dark for years. I no longer felt like a crazy person, I had a reason to be tired all the time, I wasn't imagining more joint pain.
"EDS is considered a rare disease...and it is incredibly discouraging when no one has ever heard of it, when you have to spell it for your doctor and watch him Google it to find out how to treat you, when no one you know has it, and you are forever the weird one. It makes for a very challenging, lonely journey."
Appearances are deceiving. You can't judge a person's eligibility for sickness benefit by looking at him or her. So don't do it.