CIA torture

Trump's director of the CIA, Mike Pompeo has ruled out using enhanced interrogation techniques, this is something to be welcomed. However, we should remain concerned that the individual who holds the most powerful position in the free world, advocates a view which is morally indefensible.
Mr Obama's rhetoric over US torture is one of condemning the actions and adjuring us to "leave" them "where they belong - in the past". As if that answers to the seriousness of what took place. Few people would be content with a political arrangement which went no further than the condemning-and-leaving tactic if we were considering the everyday crimes of theft, fraud, assault or rape. I don't see why an official US programme of organised kidnap, illegal imprisonment and serial assault should be any different.
Comedian John Oliver returned to his critique of the post-9/11 CIA torture programme on his Sunday show, enlisting Oscar
Shaker Aamer, a Saudi Arabian citizen and the last British resident to be held without charge at Guantanamo bay has still not been given the freedom he deserves after more than 13 years of imprisonment.
If torture worked, the need to criminalise it would be even more imperative than if it were ineffective because the temptation to use it would then be even greater. If torture did not work there would be no need to use it. It was largely because the CIA believed, or persuaded itself, that it did work that it became such a widespread practice.
It came as little surprise that the official inquiry into the circumstances that led to the Woolwich attack paid scant attention to the role UK intelligence played in the abuse of Michael Adebolajo in Kenya. In his court appearance last December Michael Adebolajo himself did not mention whether or not the incident had an impact on his own thinking in the run-up to Woolwich.
The release of this report teaches us an important lesson; that it is easy for the rule of law and our own civility to be lost in a climate of fear, where pressing concerns are focused on finding ways to protect ourselves from dangerous and evil forces like Al Qaeda or ISIS. Behaviour that compromises such principles, however, will invariably fail to keep us safe.
Industrial band Skinny Puppy has invoiced the US government for $666,000 after it was revealed their music was used to torture
If torture, or 'severe interrogation', is so ineffective in gaining useful intelligence - as is widely believed - why did the CIA persist with it over such an extended period?
An in-depth and open inquiry about the intelligence community's actions during the 'war on terror' is well overdue. For once, actually following the Americans' recent example would be a good place to start.