cities

It's no secret that, in the 21st century, we take a lot for granted. We've come to rely on technologies and services that even a decade ago didn't exist. Smartphones and internet-based apps are obvious examples here, but I want to draw your attention to another service that is often less considered.
Digital technologies will shape how city administrations interact with citizens, how they deliver services, and how they enable new companies to grow. City leaders I talk to know that this digital future is upon us. But most are still not investing enough in the people and facilities they need to harness these technologies.
In many ways the planning system has done a good job: trying to balance competing demands for scarce resources and mediating between economic forces and the views of local communities. And, over the years, it has proved remarkably resilient.
Light has become a unique point of interest within the built environment on three fronts; sustainability, mental health, and
Cities are the hotbeds of culture, ideas, commerce, science and social development. The UN has estimated that half of humanity
In 2016, the global population was estimated to be 7.4 billion; a figure that the United Nations believes will increase to 11.2 billion by the year 2100. Today, one in eight of those 7.4 billion people are over the age of 60. This number is expected to increase as our overall quality of life continues to improve and we all live longer - with life expectancy even breaking the 90 barrier as soon as 2030, according to Imperial College London and the World Health Organization.
In January this year, the government launched a consultation on its new Industrial Strategy. This envisages our economic future as one backed by science and based on cutting-edge innovation, aims to build on excellence and also to spread growth across the UK through more focus on 'place'.
In the UK, we have largely built our towns and cities, so a better question might be: 'How could we enhance our cities by overlaying a digital layer?' This layer, spread over the physical, helps us to understand our cities better and create services that allow citizens to interact with the city - and each other - differently.
Business rates. You see... some of you are already nodding off! Business rates - how they are calculated, how they are billed
Break down the result of the referendum and you will see that the growing division in England and Wales is not between North and South - or even left and right - but between towns and cities. We are increasingly a country made up of two groups of people whose shared experiences, political priorities and outlook, on the surface, are united on the surface by very little at all.