Citizen journalism

Lots of journalists and politicians have had their say about the bad state of the British tabloid press after the phone hacking
Amnesty has recorded at least 17 incidents where Syria's armed opposition groups have deliberately targeted journalists and media workers, but the bulk of killings, detentions and cases of gruesome mistreatment still come at the hands of government forces.
In fact it's always timely to be reminded of the fact that journalists are a vital pillar of any properly functioning democratic society. And this is notwithstanding the recent hammering that some parts of the profession have taken in this country over phone-hacking and other illegal activity. The fall-out from Leveson shouldn't distract us from the extremely serious work that journalists regularly do.
Following the Boston bombings, anyone following the relevant feeds and hashtags would have seen a surge of contradictory stories and speculation, some important and true, others later exposed as nonsense. Twitter is both an enormous rumour mill, and invaluable source of valuable information. I could end this article here, but academics have been studying this question in detail since at least 2010, so I'm about to get a little technical.
We've all got TV cameras in our pockets these days and television sucks up the material with glee. From filming a knife-wielding man tasered by police outside Buckingham Palace to the helicopter crash in London ordinary people are newsgathering extraordinary events everyday. Everyone's a journalist now: bearing witness and reporting it on Twitter and YouTube.
I chose Pascual Pichun to be the main character of my film because he has been a symbol of the Mapuche indigenous struggle since he was 17.
While on a ski holiday enjoying a bit of snow last weekend, I caught some coverage of the Guardian Open Weekend event. One
Would the Sun have survived the hacking scandal if the News of the World had been called the Sun on Sunday? Probably not.
When a war reporter is killed, it is possible to feel as if their work has been silenced. Last reports are left unwritten
For a day at least, we should stop and think of the reporters - whether working for an international news organisation, a local paper, or simply blogging - who are risking their lives every day to ask the difficult questions, lend a voice to the voiceless and get the story.