Citizen science

Manchester is the 2016 European City of Science, which recognises our unique scientific heritage and our vital contribution to discovery, invention and industry. The UK's second city has produced a wealth of innovations - it is the place where the industrial revolution began, the atom was split and the programmable computer was created.
As you can see, some of our finds were common, some rare - but all demonstrate how critical it is to conserve, enhance and expand our wildlife habitats and how important it is for visitors to record our wildlife.
A team of scientists from the University of Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and World Animal Protection are looking to combine both original thinking and citizen science into a single initiative. Specifically, we are calling out to the world's most creative minds - "Can you think for tigers?"
In the last week alone, more than 10 million people have visited the NHS Choices website. Often viewed as the public go-to place for a wide-range of health information, it is somewhere many of us turn to when feeling under the weather or looking for advice.
The geotagging - which says where you are - can then be used to compare with existing mapping data to see whether you are in a deprived or affluent area, whether there are many trees or rivers nearby, and even what levels of pollution there are.
Without getting into a long winded debate about what constitutes a true citizen science project I will boldly state that I think citizen science is anything that engages people with the process of science.
Britain is... one of the least science-intensive economies in the G8. Our news media, despite all its past travails and improvements, still comes under fire for communicating science badly. Funding for science is an incredibly tiny proportion of total public spending.
What we see with data today is a similar situation to what we had in the era prior to Web 2.0, where there was a lot of content around, but socialisation over that content was not enabled. Just as we've seen with the social media boom of recent years, however, there is now an opportunity and appetite for creating communities of interest around the socialisation of data.
When I was young I was probably like a lot of kids, - not really sure what science was, why it was important, and disengaged. I've since learned that science is one of the most engaging, inspiring and creative subjects on the curriculum. It's the part of the school day when the entire universe enters the classroom and young people have the chance to not only learn about the world we live in but also the challenges we face in the future...
It's no secret that better collaboration between scientists can lead to new insights and faster discoveries, and the world's richest countries are now using this idea globally to push for a dementia cure.