clicktivism

Instead of complaining about the insidious nature of digitised life, the media needs to learn how better to utilise it and connect with youth. For instance, as a newspaper addict I consume most national publications every day and can count on one hand the number of serious commentators under the age of 40.
Without the use of the internet and social media the New Era residents would have struggled to put pressure on a decision maker thousands of miles away. And without good old fashioned solidarity rallies, the campaign would have failed to capture the hearts of the public. That's how you win campaigns today.
This power is now in our hands, or more precisely, at our fingertips. In sharing and commenting on these articles and petitions, we have begun to do away with the idea that we are unable to help or to change things.
The danger of the hashtag is the accompanying sense that the hashtagger has 'done their bit' in a humanitarian crisis. No need to submit a monetary donation, volunteer for a charity or arrange a fundraiser like the good old days; the beauty of social media means that you just have to press a key and you've made somebody's life that little bit better. But have you?
As the digital revolution continues its inexorable march into every aspect of our daily lives, the way we engage with the political process is undergoing a fundamental shift. Digital media are transforming the way we interact with political campaigns, lobby our elected representatives, strive for accountable government, and even how we conduct revolution.
In the autumn of 1998, in the midst of impeachment proceedings against former US President Bill Clinton, a couple from Silicon Valley launched a one-sentence petition online. Their demand of Congress was simple...
If bashing equality-seeking movements is your thing, you'll already be down with the failings of feminism. Exclusionary, ineffective and irrelevant, we're a middle class movement which bolted the drawing-room doors against the masses as suffragettes, and has continued to alienate everybody with a load of intellectual blah-blah ever since.
What is clear is that emerging factors have combined to expose big business and its place in society to increasingly intense and critical scrutiny. A very selective list might include the banking crisis and corporate tax scandals, the shrinking state, climate change and other environmental impacts, and the inequities and injustices in value chains, so horribly highlighted at the Dhaka garment factory.
A war is being fought. Its battlefields are the pages of social networking sites across the globe, and its soldiers are armed with placards and computer cursors. This is the battle of traditional activism versus clicktivism
On June 30 2011 activists held a protest outside the Department of Culture Media and Sport against the takeover of BSkyB