coastline

We need to be prepared to adapt and move out of harm's way where ever we can at the coast, as 'holding the line' is going to become more difficult in the face of rising sea levels and increased storminess.
Close your eyes for a minute. Think of a favourite place on the coast. Tune into your memory sound bank and start to imagine the sounds that fill the airwaves. It could be the sounds from the days spent at the coast as a kid when the day felt like it would never end. Or it might be a trip to a seabird colony clinging to the cliffs and creating an intense wall of sound.
These memories of days at the seaside as children are part of our national DNA. Millions of Brits head to the coast every year. And there is a rich social history of the connections between the big cities and the nearest stretch of coastline.
As a nation shaped by the coast and drawn to the sea the news, announced by the deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, that a coastal footpath around the shores of England will be completed ten years early by 2020 represents one great big stride to opening up access to a remarkable coastline.
Millions of us spend a fair amount of time daydreaming about being at the coast. Living by the sea with those views into what appears to be infinity and the dreamy sunrises and sunsets has enchanted generations. And yet that sense of things always being the same at the seaside, a constant in a turning world, seems to be changing.
A man who drowned while trying to rescue a young girl as she was being swept out to sea has been named by police. Bulgarian
A man has died trying to rescue two children from the sea on the Sussex coastline. The 25-year-old drowned after jumping
The tail-end of Hurricane Katia has battered the UK coastline as it crossed the Atlantic Ocean. We've captured some of the