common-entrance

Are there words that strike fear into a teacher more than "Ofsted is visiting"? Cue sleepless nights producing a week's worth of lesson plans, a rainforest's worth of admin and cross your fingers that little Jonny who fires paper planes from the back of the class, is off with a cold. Then of course, careers hang in the balance and self-esteem is shot if the inspector that sat in your class for half an hour deems your teaching to be unsatisfactory.
Working together is the best option, it would benefit children, teachers, parents and schools, cohesive learning is the best way forward! Regardless of all the changes that are taking place, parents wouldn't be scared any more if we work together, they'd be happy.
The apps reviewed are excellent additional revision resources and learning aids and a lot of them are totally free. I would recommend that both students and their parents get to grips with what's out there to help with revision planning, note-taking, data storage, grammar aids and exam count downs.
A personal tutor can often find a weak area and address the problem when a teacher (however gifted) can overlook this in a noisy, demanding class of 20 children.
The Common Entrance exam is used as an admissions process for academically selective independent secondary schools. Children attend preparatory school to ready themselves for the exams and sit them aged 13.
The Common Entrance English exam assesses a child's ability to critically think about new, never seen before, passages. They'll have to think on their feet, read the passage and then qualitatively describe what the piece is about. Not an easy task.
Well, first of all what ever happens don't worry or panic (Many people will!) I would say that these are your best options - all are creditworthy and all will help you to succeed in the future: