company culture

At a point where the Care sector is desperate for innovative solutions to challenges of low pay, an approach which makes employees owners in their business, and which drives their engagement, is one which more providers should examine closely.
But in reality are we really headed for a dystopian sci-fi future where the threat to humanity is on a global scale? Probably not, but AI will certainly impact our working lives as it has our home lives.
It's time for us to use today's innovative technologies, like Augmented Intelligence (AI), to take action, starting with correcting unconscious bias. We're already using AI to predict the weather and to process medical research and trial data for individualized treatment plans on an unheard-of scale. Why can't it be used to help close the gender gap?
The word 'restructure' in the corporate world is enough to send a shiver down the spine of anyone who has endured one before.
How did a high tech startup, headquartered in Scotland's historic capital, become the global travel gateway it is today? And how does it maintain that startup culture, seemingly so crucial to its success, now that it is much more than a dream etched on a beer mat?
A company culture is often created by a single person: the company founder. It is a set of values and behaviours that employees are asked to buy into in order to be successful at that company. If "done well" the company culture can bring many benefits. A positive company culture gives clients and customers a strong brand to identify with; it helps employees understand what success and achievement looks like, and gives them clear goals.
At the recent launch of new guidance on mental health at work, Health Minister Earl Howe said: "A good working environment is crucial for our wellbeing." But, with three or four generations of people in the workplace - all with different needs and working styles - how can employers create the right environment for everyone?