Conscientious Objector

100 years ago, Germany's first female jurist, a former actress named Anita Augspurg, organised a 1,200-strong international women's congress in The Hague delivering a simple message to world leaders: no more war.
Democracy is only as legitimate as the freedom it guarantees its citizens. Freedom of thought, body and conscience are denied to Israelis as long as it continues to force unwilling teenagers towards war.
The conference was not for but about African heritage women so the white participants had every right to be there. At the same time the systemic exclusion of black women in the west causes deep, legitimate wounds. Nsukka demonstrates how important it is to communicate, and to voice difficult feelings such as anger and hurt, in order to find solutions.
May 15th will be marked this year by a simple ceremony in Tavistock Square. People will gather to remember those who for reasons of Conscientious Objection refused conscription into the armed services in the First World War.
On Remembrance Sunday, Britain falls silent to honour the sacrifices made by servicemen and women. But should those who refused