Consumer Electronics Show

Hyundai unveiled a car that can walk and climb on wheeled legs at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. The 'Elevate' vehicle was designed with the emergency services in mind. But it's unlikely to be appearing at a local dealership any time soon, as it’s only a prototype for now.
It's a strange way to start the New Year, but in the first week of January the world's tech industry gathers together in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronic Show. Now in its 50th year (and my second), the show is a chance for the great and the good to demonstrate their latest innovations to a willing audience of over 175,000 visitors
As the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) draws to a close for another year, we've seen a wide range of new gadgets and tech capabilities that could transform our daily lives in the near or not-so-near future. From drones, AI robots and virtual reality to a whole clutch of "smart" devices, we're now left to debate which of the items debuted at CES will enter the mainstream.
Pepper the humanoid robot has been around for a while, and this year she was present at CES in her newest incarnation. For $20,000, all four feet of doe-eyed, glossy white plastic will talk to you, read your emotions, sense when you are sad, dance to music and wiggle its bottom.
CES 2015 is now over. With journalists and tech companies alike now escaping the Nevada desert all that remains is for us
Often gimmicks that make the most interesting story, while the genuinely useful stuff gets sidelined. To help sort the wheat from the chaff, here are three game changing gadgets from CES, and three you'll probably never own.
For one week, CES is home to every technological innovation under the sun. The good, the bad and the downright odd. While
The Consumer Electronics Show 2015 is off to a strong -- albeit strange -- start and already we're beginning to see that
The recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES) was dominated by two things - wearable technology and AI assisted gadgets. From toothbrushes telling us how to polish our teeth, to smart beds suggesting how to sleep, to video games that adapt to our style of play this year saw AI come of age from a consumer perspective.